A Random Girl 's NEVERENDING Story . . .
Instagram
A Random Girl 's NEVERENDING Story . . .
+
+
mazzystardust:

 Solange Knowles, 2013 
+
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
journolist:

Ferguson, Missouri Update
Ferguson Round-Up (8/19)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/18)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/15)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/14)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/13)
Ferguson Round-Up (8/12)
Outburst interrupts night of peace in Ferguson (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) 
Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said 47 people were arrested and three loaded handguns were seized during the protests Tuesday night and early today. In a news conference that began at about 2:15 this morning, Johnson said officers interrupted criminal activities and prevented violence. “Protest crowds were a bit smaller, and they were out earlier,” he said, noting that no Molotov cocktails were thrown or bullets fired by protesters. However, he said some “criminals and agitators” threatened police, threw glass and plastic bottles — some filled with urine — at officers and hid behind members of the media covering the protests.
Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson (New York Times)
As a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence on Wednesday in the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer that touched off 10 days of unrest here, witnesses have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts of the killing.
Ferguson Turmoil Continues With Another Shooting, More Arrests (TruthDig)
The face-off between police and protesters in and around Ferguson, Mo., continued Tuesday, with tensions further kindled by reports of another police shooting and by more details about slain teenager Michael Brown. President Obama sounded a note of empathy for “young men of color” who are “left behind and seen only as objects of fear” and called for calm as the National Guard made its presence known on the scene and Attorney General Eric Holder announced his plans to travel there Wednesday.
Nobody Knows How Many Americans The Police Kill Each Year (FiveThirtyEight)
Earlier this month, a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. The shooting and the response have reignited concerns about racial profiling, police brutality and police militarization. The incident has also drawn attention to a remarkable lack of knowledge about a seemingly basic fact: how often people are killed by the police. Some reporting has put forward one of the only figures available: the approximately 400 “justifiable police homicides” each year since 2008, according to the FBI’s annual Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR). That data point has appeared with heavy caveats in a string of media reports, including in USA Today, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Washington Post. The statistic might seem solid at first glance. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Bureau of Justice Statistics — independently of the FBI — also estimate the number of police homicides per year at around 400.
Police Misconduct Costs Black People Their Livelihood Even When It Spares Their Lives (Think Progress)
As anger and frustration continue in Ferguson, Missouri over the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer, which appears to be a result of the use of excessive force, attention must also go to the excessive economic coercion used by America’s police. Frivolous traffic stops and coercive threats allow police to extract money from citizens through tickets, fines, and court costs. Economic intimidation via petty stops, searches, and seizures is a national problem that finds particular resonance in minority communities like Ferguson.
Police mistrust still prevalent years later (Associated Press)
rown’s death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown’s death. “In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement,” the president said.
‘Outside agitators’ worsening unrest in Ferguson, Mo., residents say (Kansas City Star)
“People of Ferguson are getting punished for the actions of outside agitators,” said Kenny Murdock, 47, who hosts a show on a St. Louis radio station. Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who had been documenting the protests and the security response on social media, pointed via Twitter to a small group of people who “cannot be defined as protesters/demonstrators. They are more like fighters/rebels/insurgents.” The crowds at night are younger and rowdier, said Laparasena Gandy, 25, who protested Monday across from the Ferguson Police Department. 
What was THAT? A guide to the military gear being used against civilians in Ferguson (Vox)
The extremely militaristic police response to the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, which have occurred nightly since a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown to death on August 9, has shocked many Americans. In its tactics, appearance, and especially equipment, the security operation looks more like it belongs on a battlefield in Iraq or Afghanistan than in the streets of an American suburb. Armored vehicles, tear gas, full combat gear, rifles — what is all that? From LRADs to MRAPs, here’s a brief guide to the equipment being used against civilians in the St. Louis suburb.
This Is The Most Important Reform Ferguson Can Enact To Give Its Black Residents A Voice (ThinkProgress)
If you compared the racial makeup of Ferguson, Missouri’s population as a whole to that of its government, it would be easy to mistake the city for an enclave of Jim Crow. Although nearly 70 percent of Ferguson is black, 50 of its 53 police officers are white. So are five of Ferguson’s six city council members. The mayor, James Knowles, is a white Republican. Ferguson can help ensure that its leaders more closely resemble its population, however. They just need to hold their elections at a time when voters are actually likely to show up.
#FeedFerguson raises $71,000, keeps going (KSDK)
A school teacher from Raleigh has helped raise more than $71,000 in just four short days for the children of Ferguson, according to FeedTheStudents.org. Julianna Mendelsohn, 33, started a Fundly campaign on August 14 with the aim to raise $80,000 for the St Louis Foodbank. The teacher cited the fact that many children in the U.S. rely on school to get what could be the kids only meal for the day.
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention (New York Times)
For people in the news business, Twitter was initially viewed as one more way to promote and distribute content. But as the world has become an ever more complicated place — a collision of Ebola, war in Iraq, crisis in Ukraine and more — Twitter has become an early warning service for news organizations, a way to see into stories even when they don’t have significant reporting assets on the ground. And in a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.
Ferguson Unrest Shows Poverty Growing Fastest in Suburbs (Bloomberg)
Six days of violence and protests in a town outside St. Louis are highlighting how poverty is growing fastest on the outskirts of America’s cities, as suburbs have become home to a majority of the nation’s poor. In Ferguson, Missouri, a community of 21,000 where the poverty rate doubled since 2000, the dynamic has bred animosity over racial segregation and economic inequality. Protests over the police killing of an unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9 have drawn international attention to the St. Louis suburb’s growing underclass.
Ferguson Police Militarization: Cash Flowed To Lawmakers Who Voted To ‘Militarize’ Police (International Business Times)
As local law enforcement has deployed martial tactics against those protesting the police killing of an 18-year-old in Ferguson, Missouri, a debate is suddenly raging over how municipal police forces came to resemble military units. A new report suggests the trend may, in part, have to do with campaign contributions to congressional lawmakers.
Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source); 7 (Source); 8 (Source); 
+
+
krisinsanity:



Three of 12 pictures of ɑːˈliːə
+
+
fl-orish:

aiela:

hiddlestonhug:

laylacon:

tropical-cave:

tropical-cave:

brianmchale:

welcometomylifeex3:

raquelsh0lding0ntillmay:

foundmywaywheniwaslost:

alittledoseofsunshine:

sort-of-un-balanced:

I posted this three times tonight and had three people tell me that I helped save their life. Thank you to those people who have decided to struggle through to let us enjoy the gift of one more day of their prescence gracing us all. I hope that you all reblog this, to save another few. Because we all dserve another chance and hope in life. I went to the hospital 6 times before I decided to keep my life but I hope none of you suffer that much. And I hope you all can make that scary, seemingly painful, blind, hoping, wonderful step to live.
I want to help you in any way I can. ANYTHING. I mean it. If I had had someone stay with me and text me or talk to me all night, just one time, it would have changed my life. I know how hard those nights can be.
<3,
Love,
Emily

^I love this girl more than words can express.  

foundmywaywheniwaslost: I am always here if anyone ever needs to talk/vent. You have a purpose, Please Stay Alive. <3

Not just for tonight but for the rest of your life. You have so much to look forward to in the future that if you choose to kill yourself, it will be the biggest mistake of your life. You’re going to miss out on people you’ll never be able to meet, kids you’ll never have, a partner to love or partys to go to. There’s just too much that you’ll miss out on. You deserve and have the right to be here as much as the person next to you does. You’re just a drop in the ocean. You were meant to be here and you have a purpose. Don’t ever forget that. And if you feel like you don’t, just believe in yourself because you do. If you ever feel worthless or like shit, know that I love you and those dicks that tell you shit are jealous that you’re who you are because there’s something about you that they wish they could have. Please stay strong and never give up because things DO GET BETTER.

3rd time I reblog this xx

Keep your self awake, I hope your here to stay. This day is not yet over, let me be your four leaf clover.

Reblogged it and queued it so it’ll post tomorrow too. And the next day and the next so I hope I can save someone. We all love you.

someone messaged me this morning saying it helped and thanked me, so im reblogging this again, and queuing it. stay strong guys. 

I reblog this whenever I see it. If you don’t reblog it, unfollow me right now. If you don’t care enough to put this simple picture on your blog, I’m judging you.

The very first time that I reblogged this, I had someone message me the next day saying that because of me, they didn’t kill themself. From then on whenever I see anything like this on Tumblr it’s an instant reblog for me. After receiving that message it just changed something in me. Whenever anyone I see on my dash is having thoughts of self-harm or even suicide, I automatically go to their page and offer them even just an ear to listen. Nearly all of them I receive messages back from saying that they are grateful, and they end up sharing their story with me, and in return I give them advice as best I can. Several of them have said that their lives have gotten much better because they opened up and sought out help.
Out of those people, I’d say at least 5  have even gone so far as to say that they didn’t kill themself because of me. That is, I kid you not, the best feeling in the world.

forever reblog <3

doesnt matter what blog style, you have to reblog this
+
+
+
+
+
blacknoonajade:

This is the incident report that the Ferguson police just produce. Now if you don’t know, this morning they FINALLY named the killer of Michael Brown as Darren Wilson. Along with naming Darren as the killer, the Ferguson police are now trying to link Michael Brown with a robbery that happened supposedly MOMENTS before. 
Michael was killed at 12:01 and this robbery was at 11:54. 
There are so many questions.
We’ve seen the surveillance photos they’ve produced that shows someone who looks like Michael being aggressive with a store owner over an apparent box of swishers. (If you don’t know, Swishers are cigar papers you can pick up for like…2 for .50.
They are saying that Officer Darren Wilson was responding to that robbery.
They are calling it an STRONG ARMED ROBBERY
 A strong armed robbery is using, involving, or threatening the use of physical force or violence to gain an objective:
Okay, got that bullshit out of the way
The dispatch tapes that were released mention NOTHING ABOUT A ROBBERY.
NOT ONE WORD
THE ONLY THING MENTIONED WAS A SHOOTING AND REQUEST FOR CROWD CONTROL.
THAT’S IT
So how did Officer Wilson FIND OUT about the robbery? 
They’ve now listed Dorian Johnson (THE ONLY OTHER EYEWITNESS WHO WAS THERE) as the second accomplice to the robbery. 
The same Dorian Johnson who has been trying (in vain) to talk with the Ferguson Police Department about Michael’s Death since LAST SATURDAY.
So this man who is this SECOND SUSPECT IN A ROBBERY CASE IS PLEADING WITH YOU AND IS ALL OVER NATIONAL NEWS AND YOU ARE REFUSING TO SEE HIM. BUT HE’S A SUSPECT IN A ROBBERY. OKAY
When Officer Wilson sees both Michael and Dorian his initial reaction was "GET THE FUCK ON THE SIDEWALK."
Not any kind of reaction dealing with them being robbery suspects. 
From some of the pictures (I’m not going to post them due to the family’s wishes) if you compare the footage from the store and the footage from Michael’s death, he’s swapped from Nike sandals to Sneakers. This red hat cannot be found (this is speculation).
If the reason Office Wilson approached them was because they were suspects in an robbery WHY DIDN’T HE CALL IT IN? WHY DIDN’T HE FOLLOW PROCEDURE? WHY WOULD HE ROLL UP ON ROBBERY SUSPECTS IN HIS VEHICLE? WHY DID IT TAKE 6 DAYS FOR THIS TO BE ANNOUNCED?
I implore you. IMPLORE YOU to take a look into the presented facts of the case. This is just an incident report, we do not have access to the investigative report. There has been no reports presented of Michael’s autopsy and this report is contradictory of the second eye witnesses report.
None of this makes sense. 
They are putting Michael on trial to dehumanize him, villify him, to make him less human to justify his murder.
And at the end of the day, LET’S JUST SAY MICHAEL DID DO THIS…is petty theft (it was like 5 swisher sweets they say. That’s a two dollars and fifty sense) IS HIS MURDER, HIS EXECUTION, THIS UNARMED SURRENDING TEENAGE BOY, justified by this?
NO.
It’s not.
This is murder. Don’t let them put Michael on trial for HIS DEATH.  
+
livdash:

so-personal:

everything personal♡


My mum says im a handful and no man will put up with me 😪😪😪😪
+
thefashiondontlivewithoutvogue:

Sade on the cover of The Face April 1984
+